Politics, Weather, Photography, and the Dog
Tuesday 16 October 2012

A quorum:

All for now.

Tuesday 16 October 2012 13:10:42 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Aviation | Kitchen Sink | US#
Monday 15 October 2012

Well, that was a fun demo. Fortunately we have four more Agile iterations before we're done.

So, now that I have precisely thirteen minutes to catch up on my email and the news of the day, I will note this lede that could only come from a left-leaning British newspaper:

BAA is to drop its name in favour of plain Heathrow after concluding that the initials, derived from the old British Airports Authority, no longer fit a foreign-owned company with no authority that has been forced to sell off half its airports.

So, Stansted will be run from Heathrow. That should really drive people there.

Monday 15 October 2012 16:50:14 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Aviation#
Sunday 14 October 2012

I still haven't moved everything out of the Inner Drive Technology Worldwide Data Center to Microsoft Windows Azure, because the architecture of Weather Now simply won't support the move without extensive refactoring. But this week I saw the first concrete, irrefutable evidence of cost savings from the completed migrations.

First, I got a full bill for a month of Azure service. It was $94. That's actually a little less than I expected, though in fairness it doesn't include the 5–10 GB database that Weather Now will use. Keep in mind, finishing the Azure migration means I get to shut off my DSL and landline phone, for which AT&T charges me $55 for the DSL and $100 for the phone.

I also found out how much less energy I'm using with 3 of 5 servers shut down. Here is my basic electricity use for the past two years:

The spikes are, obviously, air conditioning—driven very much by having the server rack. Servers produce heat, and they require cooling. I have kept the rack under 25°C, and even at that temperature, the servers spin up their cooling fans and draw even more power. The lowest usage periods, March to May and October to December, are cool and moist, so I don't use either air conditioning or humidifiers.

Until this month, my mean electricity use was 1100 kWh per month overall, 1386 kWh in the summer, and 908 kWh in the shoulder seasons. In the last two years, my lowest usage was 845 kWh.

Last month it was 750 kWh. Also notice how, during the much hotter summer in 2012 (compared with 2011), my electricity use was slightly lower. It was just harder to see the savings until now.

Including taxes, that means the bill was only $20 less than the usual shoulder-season bill. But I'm not General Motors; that $20 savings is 20% of the bill. Cutting my electricity bills 20% seems like a pretty good deal. And next summer, with no servers in the house, I'll be able to run less air conditioning, and the A/C won't have to compete with the heat coming off the server rack.

Now I've just got to figure out how to migrate Weather Now...

Sunday 14 October 2012 10:57:07 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Business | Cloud#
Saturday 13 October 2012

So far this month, I've worked about 110 hours (no exaggeration), in part preparing for a pair of software demos on Monday. Normal blogging will likely return tomorrow or Monday.

Meanwhile, here's a picture of Parker:

That's from six years ago this week. Everyone together, now: "Awwwwwwww."

Saturday 13 October 2012 13:06:43 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Kitchen Sink | Parker#
Thursday 11 October 2012

My latest entry is up on the 10th Magnitude tech blog.

You can also read it right here.

Thursday 11 October 2012 13:23:29 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Business | Cloud | Security#

My nephew, Conner:

Thursday 11 October 2012 13:19:40 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Kitchen Sink#

I am officially an uncle.

Good morning, Conner. Welcome to the world. Don't let your last 13 hours turn you off to it. It gets better.

Nick, Jeanine: congratulations, you crazy kids. Let me know when you're ready to have me corrupt him.

Thursday 11 October 2012 08:44:06 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Kitchen Sink#
Wednesday 10 October 2012

Yes, more links:

Later today I'll also have a new post on the 10th Magnitude blog.

Wednesday 10 October 2012 11:35:18 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Aviation | Geography | US#

I have just inflicted this on my friends; you're next:


After the "incident" with Esmerelda, the Cathedral of Our Lady in Paris—Notre Dame—needed a new bell-ringer. A man showed up for the job. The bishop in charge of hiring noticed he had no arms. "Pas de problème," said the man. "I hit the bells with my head, like this." He then proceeded to play a magnificent carillon using only his face. As he reached a crescendo, the glorious music reaching out across Paris, he slipped, fell from the bell tower, and died instantly.

The monsignor ran over to the bishop and demanded, "What happened? Who is this man?"

"I don't know," said the bishop, "but his face rings a bell."

The next day, another man showed up to apply for the job. He introduced himself to the bishop, saying, "It was my brother who fell from the tower yesterday. We are all very sad, but our family is one of bell-ringers. I must take his place."

The bishop nodded, but then noticed the new man had no legs. "Pas de problème," said the brother. "Ecoutez." He climbed up to the bell tower using only his massively-powerful arms, then began another carillon, even more glorious than his brother's had been. He swung from rope to rope, in perfect time, sometimes pulling on two or three ropes at once, building to a finale that had the bishop in tears of joy.

As he rang the final bells, he returned to the ground floor, and presented him to the bishop. But before he could speak, he had a massive heart attack, and died instantly.

"Not again!" cried the monsignor. "And who was this man?"

"I don't know," said the bishop, "but he's a dead ringer for his brother."

Wednesday 10 October 2012 10:41:45 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Jokes#
Tuesday 9 October 2012

I haven't any time to write today, but I did want to call attention to these:

Back to the mines...

Tuesday 9 October 2012 16:16:20 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Chicago | Kitchen Sink | US | Business#
Monday 8 October 2012

Aaron Sorkin, writing for Maureen Dowd's column today, imagines the conversation:

BARTLET And that was quite a display of hard-nosed, fiscal conservatism when he slashed one one-hundredth of 1 percent from the federal budget by canceling “Sesame Street” and “Downton Abbey.” I think we’re halfway home. Mr. President, your prep for the next debate need not consist of anything more than learning to pronounce three words: “Governor, you’re lying.” Let’s replay some of Wednesday night’s more jaw-dropping visits to the Land Where Facts Go to Die. “I don’t have a $5 trillion tax cut. I don’t have a tax cut of a scale you’re talking about.”

OBAMA The Tax Policy Center analysis of your proposal for a 20 percent across-the-board tax cut in all federal income tax rates, eliminating the Alternative Minimum Tax, the estate tax and other reductions, says it would be a $5 trillion tax cut.

BARTLET In other words ...

OBAMA You’re lying, Governor.

Yeah, we really could have used Josiah Bartlet up there Wednesday. But there are three more debates...

Monday 8 October 2012 13:00:32 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | US#

Two aviation articles this morning. The first, via the Economist's Gulliver blog, examines how checked baggage tags have cut lost luggage down to nearly zero:

In July alone, 53 million passengers boarded domestic flights. Only about one-third of 1 percent reported a mishandled bag. Given the phenomenal scale of American aviation (measured in seats and miles, the U.S. market is three times larger than any other) and our reliance on luggage-juggling hub airports, that’s an excellent result. Even caged birds are treated pretty well by modern air travel (though remarkably, they do get airsick): In July, U.S. airlines lost just one pet.

This success is largely due to the humdrum baggage tag. That random sticky strip you rip off your suitcase when you get home? It’s actually a masterpiece of design and engineering. Absent its many innovations, you’d still be able to jet from Anchorage to Abu Dhabi. But your suitcase would be much less likely to meet you there. (Disclosure: I am a pilot for an airline that’s not mentioned in this article.)

I also had the latest from the Cranky Flier in my RSS feed this morning, about how American Airlines' management is getting PR horribly wrong:

While people might not want to fly American for its lack of reliability, it’s much more of a crisis if people don’t think the airline is safe to fly regardless of whether flights are on time or not. While I personally don’t have huge concerns about flying the airline, I’m not the general public. If I worked at American in PR, this would have me at DEFCON 1, yet the airline has treated this as if it’s just a minor issue.

The most visible of the safety issues has been the seats coming loose on 757s. This is a major issue in that it could easily be believed by the general public to be sabotage or the sign of an airline failing to do proper maintenance. Neither is remotely acceptable. It sounds like American has found a possible reason for the issue and in yet another stupid move is blaming passengers. While this issue has now apparently been fixed, real damage has been done. And now the media is piling on, making things worse.

He goes on to say that the pilots and mechanics have had a little more intelligence behind their PR efforts. I hope, I really hope, that American's executives don't kill the airline before USAirways has a chance to close the merger.

Monday 8 October 2012 12:29:34 CDT (UTC-05:00)  | Comments [0] | Aviation#
Search
On this page....
Lynx
Best laid plans...
Direct effects of moving to Azure
Coming up for air
Windows Azure deployment credentials
Brotherspawn
Conner Bradley Montano (2012— )
Aviation and time zones
La belle de la poubelle
Quick link roundup
Two presidents, smoking
On the origins of bag tags...and American's stupidity
Countdowns
The Daily Parker +3079d 01h 24m
To San Francisco 34d 22h 19m
Parker's 8th birthday 57d 11h 49m
My next birthday 138d 10h 06m
Categories
Aviation (300) Baseball (100) Best Bars (4) Biking (42) Chicago (826) Cubs (179) Duke (131) Geography (300) Higher Ground (5) Jokes (282) Kitchen Sink (578) London (32) Parker (180) Daily (204) Photography (134) Politics (302) US (1015) World (223) Raleigh (20) Readings (8) Religion (61) San Francisco (77) Software (185) Blogs (67) Business (203) Cloud (79) Cool links (122) Security (94) Travel (140) Weather (652) Astronomy (72) Windows Azure (46) Work (26) Writing (7)
Links
Archive
<October 2012>
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
30123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031123
45678910
Full archive
Blogroll
About
David Braverman and Parker
David Braverman is a software developer in Chicago, and the creator of Weather Now. Parker is the most adorable dog on the planet, 80% of the time.
Legal
All content Copyright ©2014 David Braverman.
Creative Commons License
The Daily Parker by David Braverman is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 United States License, excluding photographs, which may not be republished unless otherwise noted.
Admin Login
Sign In
Blog Stats
Total Posts: 4263
This Year: 161
This Month: 26
This Week: 10
Comments: 0